What Does It Mean To Be Healthy?

Being more healthy is a goal that many of us have. We want to lose a few pounds, lower that cholesterol, climb the stairs without getting winded.

But what, exactly, does getting “healthy” mean? Determining how to define the word health is a logical first step.

There are many different ways to be healthy: physically, mentally, emotionally, socially.

Physical health is, perhaps, the most obvious, and the easiest to measure. For instance, you can step on a scale, or count the number of reps or laps, or take your blood pressure. In January, gym memberships surge, as people try and work out regularly. They want to lose the weight they gained over the holidays.

Equally important but less often addressed is mental health. How much introspection do you do? Do you go to therapy, for yourself or with your significant other? Meditation, for example, is becoming more popular, which many people use to become more calm and centered.

Similarly, emotional health is rarely dealt with. Are you more often happy or sad? Do you express your emotions in a healthy way? Our emotional well-being is part of who we are, but we often ignore it.

Finally, there is the issue of how we fit in with others. Our relationships with friends, co-workers, and family members can be positive or negative. Healthy or unhealthy. On a larger scale, how do you fit into society? What is your carbon footprint? Are you a good citizen?

Of course, this is not meant to be an exhaustive list. There are other ways to be healthy. Can you think of some?

In short, what is your definition of health? Do you eat organic food? Run marathons? Host a weekly poker night? Vote in your town elections?

What does it mean to be healthy?

Related questions: Could everyone benefit from therapy? What duty do we have to live properly? What makes you the happiest? Resolutions or no resolutions?

 

How Do You Cheer Yourself Up?

Sometimes the world can be a depressing place. When despair threatens to overcome you, you might need to cheer yourself up.

Whether the problems are global (like climate change) or personal (like a breakup), life can be sad. We won’t be happy all the time, nor do we necessarily want to be.

Despite whatever hardships you may be going through, sometimes is necessary to be in social situations. You may need to put on a smile for the public no matter what you may feel in private.

Also, there are times when you need to be hopeful when you feel despondent. In order to keep motivated despite long odds or a difficult situation, hope can be crucial.

Other times, you may just feel it is necessary to move past whatever troubles you have. You may need to just get on with your life.

In that situation, how do you manage it? Simple denial of your feelings probably isn’t helpful. How can you accept defeat, or loss, or sadness, and learn to be happy once again? How do you cheer yourself up?

Related questions: How can we turn sadness into constructive action? What makes you the happiest? Why do we put up with unhappiness? Is happiness the most important purpose in life? Optimistic or pessimistic?