What Should You Let Go Of?

In order to grow, sometimes it is necessary to let go of a memory that is holding you back. Can you think of any such event in your life?

The New Year offers a convenient opportunity for introspection. During that period of self-examination, it is possible that you will realize that there are memories of events or people that are preventing you from realizing your potential.

There are many such traumatic or painful instances that you might obsess over. For example, your relationship with someone may be a cause of anxiety. Or you might regret a thoughtless action that you took without thinking.

The ability to let go, or move on with your life under such circumstances, can be very important. Obsessing over the past isn’t likely to be helpful or productive.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


But what does it mean to “let go”? In one instance, it might mean to forget about something entirely. Rather than replay a conversation over and over in your head, it might be better to relegate it to the past.

In another, it might be acceptance. If you come to terms with something that brings you emotional pain, it may be possible to accept it and move on.

It might also mean, literally, letting go. Throwing away a thing that has outlived its usefulness can be very meaningful.

At any rate, it is normal for human beings to be faced with regret over past speech and actions. Can you think of regrets of your own, ones that you would be best served to let go of?

Related questions: What mistake taught you the most? Are there beliefs about yourself you’ve had to let go? How do you learn? What can you control?

What Can You Learn From Loss?

We all have loss in our lives. While we can’t control that loss, we can control how we react to it. We can learn from loss.

It is important to learn from our experiences throughout our lives. After all, the only way to grow and improve, is to learn from what happens to you. While it is possible to learn from your successes and from your wins, the opportunity for self-improvement is much greater from your failures and from your losses.

When you lose someone close to you, or someone who meant a lot to you, the initial inclination is to be sad. That makes sense. The person is no longer around to make you laugh. Or to inspire you. Or simply to sit and talk with.

However, there is a better way to honor their memory. When the person was alive, you learned from them. If you make a list — an actual, enumerated list of the lessons you learned from talking with, listening to, or watching them, it will help you feel gratitude that they were in your life.

That’s one type of learning. In addition, dealing with loss can help you learn about yourself. How do you react to sadness? How do you process grief? How do you commiserate with others?

Loss is a great time for introspection. What can you learn from loss?

Related questions: How do you deal with loss? When is is useful to fail? Why are people afraid of death?

Are There Beliefs About Yourself You’ve Had To Let Go?

It is a simple fact that people change and grow over time. Have you ever been aware of your personal change, and jettisoned beliefs about yourself?

These changes can be something simple and straightforward. For example, later in life you might grow to like a food that you couldn’t stand before. Your belief about yourself (i.e. “I don’t like tomatoes”) might need to be amended, or even dropped.

But sometimes, the belief in question might be quite abstract, or even key to your concept of self. As you age, cornerstone beliefs, like political party, religious affiliation, or career aspirations might need to be tweaked. Some might even require a complete overhaul.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


An extreme example of this would be a belief that you felt was central to who you are, one that you swore repeatedly would never change. And yet, over time, as your experiences increase, you attitude might shift subtly at first, and eventually become completely different. Has this ever happened to you?

Introspection can be a valuable tool in your mental health tool kit. Knowing what you believe in, and periodically reviewing those beliefs, can lead to your being honest with yourself. It might also lead to a mo0re fulfilled life.

Do you have any beliefs about yourself that have changed over time?

Related questions: How have you changed? What makes you you? How can we encourage meaningful conversation? What is necessary to change your mind?

 

 

How Do You Adopt New Ideas?

We are constantly being exposed to new ideas. How is it that you adopt some of them which end up being a part of who you are?

Adopting new ideas is really a multi-step process.

First, is the exposure to new ideas. That might come about through reading, conversation, travel, or others ways you might expand your personal views.

Second, you have to recognize the good ideas from the rest. Frankly, this step remains something of a mystery. How do you choose an idea as good? Or at least deserving of further consideration?


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


The third step is the one that is the focus of today’s question. Once you pick an idea as worthy (however you might do that), what is next? How do you actually incorporate it into your worldview? How does someone put into practice this new way of thinking?

All of the ideas that are floating around in your head, that make up your personality and help guide your decision making, started out as new at some point. Those ideas were plucked from your experiences, and incorporated into your self.

How did that happen? Can you make happen in the future? If so, how? How do you adopt new ideas?

Related questions: Where do ideas come from? Where do shared ideas exist? What is necessary to change your mind? How can you change your attitude?

What Would You Like To Spend Ten Thousand Hours Practicing?

Last week’s Quickfire Question dealt with the activities you have spent ten thousand hours practicing. For this week, we ask: what would you like to spend ten thousand hours practicing? In what activities would you like to become proficient?

Share why if you wish.