COVID-19?

The unprecedented events unfolding over the last week or two have come at a furious pace. The actions taken surrounding the COVID-19 virus are unlike anything seen in over a century.

As a result, there are many questions we could ask here at Intellectual Roundtable. However, we would rather hear from you, our readers.

What are the questions that you and your family are asking? What do you find yourself wondering about? Is there something you want to ask your employer, your town official, your government representative?

What are your questions about the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic?

Related questions: How do we know what we don’t know? Is it a cruel world? What is the greatest problem facing humanity? How can we turn sadness into constructive action? Freedom or security?

What Are You Thinking About?

Every week, Michael and I meet online to talk about questions for Intellectual Roundtable. These conversations always start the same way: with the question, “What are you thinking about?”

The discussions we have are wide-ranging. They might cover interesting things we have read, from online articles to non-fiction books, from novels to blogs. Sometimes we discuss thought-provoking conversations we have had with others.

The topic of our health, mental or physical, occasionally comes up. How we make the decisions about how to stay as healthy as possible, from the food we consume to our exercise routines.

We also talk about politics. We don’t spend too much time on the latest happenings in Washington D.C., but rather what we consider the ways to make life better, both for us individually but also for society in general.

Sometimes, these conversations can be distilled down to particular questions for this blog. Some of them are obvious, and make for insightful questions. But not always. Sometimes, we can’t quite get the wording right. Or the content can’t be boiled down to one sentence. Or a question just isn’t apparent.

But what we have to say is always engaging. We never run out of things to talk about, and I always end our meeting having been exposed to ideas or perspectives that I hadn’t before.

And it all comes from a simple question: What are you thinking about?

Related questions: How much of our thoughts are our own? Where do shared ideas exist? What do you think about when out for a walk? What are you reading?