How Much Risk Makes You Uncomfortable?

Over the course of a lifetime, we all encounter extreme levels of risk at some point. What level of risk makes you uncomfortable?

Risk is all around us.

Sometimes, it is physical. Perhaps you enjoy the high speeds and twisty turns of a roller coaster. Or maybe jumping out of an airplane is on your bucket list.

Another kind of risk is financial. Taking on a large debt, like a mortgage or a student loan, can be daunting. Putting your money in the stock market, where you might lose it, may seem dangerous to some.

There are also other, more abstract, kinds of risk. Asking out someone, with the possibility of being rejected. Leaving a job where you are comfortable for one that might be worse.

Apart from these riskier behaviors, we also do small things are potentially bad or dangerous. However, the downside may be so small, we might not even realize the potential harm.

For example, think about eating some tasty, but unhealthy (or fattening) food. Too much of that can put you at risk for heart disease, not to mention obesity and the many health problems that come with it.

Or maybe you buy the occasional lottery ticket. A few bucks, even if you are unlikely to win, might seem like a gamble you are willing to take for the possibility of a big payout.

Most people probably find a threshold of risk somewhere between these extremes. Not everyone is comfortable with, say, rock climbing. But most people are willing to climb over a few boulders when out for a hike.

What do you find an acceptable level of risk? Has it changed over time, and if so, how? Is your comfort level different for you than it is for a loved one, like a child or an aging parent? Have you forced yourself to take risks that you weren’t comfortable with, because of a potential reward?

Related questions: How do you evaluate risk? When did you last push the boundaries of your comfort zone? What is uncomfortable but rewarding? What is the biggest risk you’ve ever taken?

Literally Or Figuratively?

Are you more literal in your life, or more figurative? Obviously we all use both all the time, but does one mean more to you?

Share why if you wish.

Literally Or Figuratively?
© Kama

Are Animals Conscious?

I recognize that I have consciousness and am aware of who and where I am. But what about animals? Are they conscious?

The relationship between humans and other animals is complicated, to say the least.

Some animals we fear. Sometimes, that fear is obvious: sharp claws or piercing teeth are things to avoid. Others may be an evolutionary development, like fear of snakes or rats.

At the other end of the spectrum are animals we love. Ones we keep as pets, in particular dogs and cats, can become emotionally bonded to us. They might cuddle with us or attempt to please us in some way.

Still others we treat as food sources. Cows, pigs, and chickens are raised alongside many human cultures, providing milk or eggs, as well as meat.

Still other animals may not fit neatly into any of these categories. However, we can recognize their innate grace or beauty, and also see them as an important part of our ecosystem.

Regardless of the relationship, we can ask the question: Are animals conscious? We recognize the consciousness of ourselves and our fellow humans, even if we disagree with them or fight with them. But what about other animals?

If an animal is thirsty and then finds someplace to get a drink, is that an awareness of itself and its surroundings? Or is that simply instinct and not true awareness? What role does intelligence play?

And whatever answer you give, what are the ramifications of that answer? If you think that animals are indeed conscious, does that change the way we should treat them? Conversely, if you believe they are not self aware or aware of their environment, what conclusions can you draw?

Related questions: Do animals have rights? How are humans like other animals? How are they different? What is your favorite animal?