What Makes A Good Friend?

Friendship is something that everyone deals with. Even if you don’t have many — or any — friends, you probably have a pretty good idea of what you look for in a friend, even if only subconsciously.

There are many characteristics that someone might have in order to be considered a friend. Loyalty, perhaps. Being a good listener. Fun, thoughtful, networked, outgoing, goofy, shared interests, shared experiences, smart, a good conversationalist.

Of all the possible traits that a friend might have, which one is most important to you?

What makes a good friend?

To help uncover what’s important to you regarding friendship, think about these questions:

  • If you think about the close friends you have, is there some trait that they have in common?
  • What, if anything, does what you look for in a friend have to do with your experiences and your past?
  • If you’ve had a friendship come to an end, was there something lacking that caused it to fail?

Related questions: Why do we care what strangers think of us? What makes a community? Who is the most important person in your life? Who inspires you?

What Is Your Favorite Sense?

There are the five classic senses: sight, sound, smell, taste, or touch. There are also other physical senses, like balance or hunger. Or you can choose something more abstract, like a sense of compassion or justice.

Say why if you wish.

What Do You Revere?

The positive emotions we associate with the people or things in our lives can vary quite drastically. We might feel love; we might feel fondness. Desire, kinship, envy, even respect. Beyond all of those feelings, however, lies a deep and powerful feeling of admiration bordering on worship: reverence.

The things we revere can tell us a lot about ourselves, about what we value and who we want to be.

For example, if your reverence is to a deity, you might be a deeply religious person, which can shape your social circle and your views on others. If you revere an idea, like equality, that might influence your political views and actions. Those with reverence for money might seek out high-paying careers.

It might seem illogical, but you can even revere irreverence. Someone who is an iconoclast, who bristles at authority or expectations of normality, irreverence may be held up above all else.

What do you revere?

To figure this out, you might think about what you have been drawn to your entire life. What books you read, what topics of conversation come up again and again. Think about what ideas resonate with you.

Do you think you share this with the people you spend time with, either your family, your friends, or your co-workers? How important is it that you revere the same things as the people around you? How important is it to find a group of people who revere the same things as you?

Related questions: What is important? Why is love important? What humbles you? How important is respect?