What Is Your Controversial Idea?

We all have idea about ourselves, our society, and how the future will play out. Are any of your ideas controversial in nature?

It can be very easy — almost too easy, in fact — to agree with people around you. Whether it comes from the media we consume, our social media feed, or conversations we have with friends or family, thinking in lockstep is quite common.

On the other hand, holding an opinion or an idea that is controversial, particularly when people you know and respect disagree with you, can be extremely difficult. Even if your thoughts are logical and consistent, peer pressure can be a powerful force to overcome.

There is an element of human psychology that sometimes arises, however. We can also be very contrary creatures, and sometimes when everyone disagrees with you, you may be more likely to become stubborn and refuse to change your position.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


One recurring problem with controversial ideas is that they may veer dangerously close to conspiracy theories. Even if you don’t think of it that way, others may equate something controversial with something crackpot. And frankly, sometimes it is hard to tell the difference.

And yet, progress is made because people have had an idea that started out being different from the majority of people around them. Gradually, however, additional evidence may be gathered. Ideas evolve. What was once controversial may eventually become mainstream.

Do you have any ideas that you consider controversial? Why do you believe them, and how do you defend them to others?

Related questions: What do you believe? What beliefs do you have that might be wrong? How much of our thoughts are our own? How are you a non-conformist?

What Should You Let Go Of?

In order to grow, sometimes it is necessary to let go of a memory that is holding you back. Can you think of any such event in your life?

The New Year offers a convenient opportunity for introspection. During that period of self-examination, it is possible that you will realize that there are memories of events or people that are preventing you from realizing your potential.

There are many such traumatic or painful instances that you might obsess over. For example, your relationship with someone may be a cause of anxiety. Or you might regret a thoughtless action that you took without thinking.

The ability to let go, or move on with your life under such circumstances, can be very important. Obsessing over the past isn’t likely to be helpful or productive.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


But what does it mean to “let go”? In one instance, it might mean to forget about something entirely. Rather than replay a conversation over and over in your head, it might be better to relegate it to the past.

In another, it might be acceptance. If you come to terms with something that brings you emotional pain, it may be possible to accept it and move on.

It might also mean, literally, letting go. Throwing away a thing that has outlived its usefulness can be very meaningful.

At any rate, it is normal for human beings to be faced with regret over past speech and actions. Can you think of regrets of your own, ones that you would be best served to let go of?

Related questions: What mistake taught you the most? Are there beliefs about yourself you’ve had to let go? How do you learn? What can you control?

Why Are We So Divided?

No matter which metric you use, it seems like there is a yawning gap between people. We are more divided than ever. What is fueling this growing difference?

Short of an escalation into violence, it’s difficult to imagine a more divided population than exists in the United States and the world.

Income inequality means more families are struggling to make ends meet. At the same time, wealth is being concentrated in fewer and fewer hands.

There are more people leaving organized religion with each passing year. Those that remain feel persecuted.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss the related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


But by far, the most intense division is political. Individuals in different political parties can’t even seem to have a civil conversation. Each side believes the other one is destroying the country. As a result, we are self-selecting into opposing neighborhoods, cities, and states. Nuance, complexity, and compromise are forgotten or ignored.

How did we get here? What is the cause of this division? Is it a media that is chasing advertising money? Or political leaders looking to consolidate power and influence? Are the wealthy looking to collect even more money? Are the poor lazy and shiftless? Alternately, are social media outlets — a new technology — spreading misinformation in the interest of attracting viewers?

In your opinion, who is to blame for our current state of disunity? And more importantly, perhaps, how can we reverse that trend and see our commonalities rather than our differences? Why are we so divided?

Related questions: What do we have in common? How can we encourage meaningful conversation? Why do we hate? How do we know we are right?

Turn The Other Cheek Or Give ‘Em A Taste Of Their Own Medicine?

When confronted, is it best to turn the other cheek, or to strike back as you were struck?

Share why if you wish.

Turn The Other Cheek Or Give 'Em A Taste Of Their Own Medicine?
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