How Do You Deal With Major Life Changes?

As we go through life, there are bound to be major changes that happen to you. When they do, how do you deal with it?

When you look back on your life, chances are you remember most clearly the times when things changed. Graduation, getting married, a new job, and so on.

It is easy to see why these moments are memorable. Most likely, there are many new experiences involved, and when your brain is active forming new connections, memories are formed along with them. In addition, when things are changing, your future is uncertain, and that uncertainty can be scary (which is memorable).

These major life events can lead to all sorts of emotions, possibly at the same time: happiness, fear, loneliness, nervousness, relief, anticipation, and so on. Because of this, there are also numerous ways to react.

If you let your happiness dictate your response, you may react with more at ease. Fear, on the other hand, may lead you to reacting defensively or cautiously. Other emotions may lead to different reactions.

Can you think of patterns to how you react to big life changes, whether they are good or bad changes? Maybe you are consumed with glee or worry; perhaps you instead try to remain logical and as unemotional as possible. Or something else entirely.

How you deal with life’s big changes can say a lot about who you are. If so, what does it say about you?

Related questions: What was your last big change? What makes change possible? Can people change? How have you changed?

How Do You Describe What You Do?

Whether it is your career, your hobbies, or your private life, how you describe yourself can alter how the world sees you. What is your description?

Describing what you do, while important, can be very difficult. While it is true that what you choose to spend your time and focus on helps define you as a human being, an accurate description isn’t easy.

In fact, the manner and vocabulary you use to talk about what you do has many risks. You might bore someone else if you choose to talk about it in a clinical way. It is possible you could alienate someone who doesn’t share a common frame of reference. You might even offend someone.

And yet, sharing who you are and what you do with others is the essence of being in a community. If you have an interest in and a passion for what you do, you can convey that to someone else. And in turn, they may convey the same thing to you, if you are lucky.

How do you describe what you do? Have you given advance thought to what you might say to someone else? And do you listen when others describe what they do?

Related questions: Would you be friends with yourself? How would you describe yourself in ten words or less? How do you judge yourself? What makes a community?

Do You Consider Yourself A Happy Person?

Everyone is happy some of the time, and unhappy other times. On the whole, though, do you consider yourself to be a happy person?

How can you tell? It is tempting to simply count the number of times you are happy. If you are happy more often than not, you are a happy person.

But that can miss an important nuance: you may consider yourself to be a happy person, even if you are unhappy more than fifty percent of the time. Similarly, you might consider yourself to be an unhappy person, even if the happy times make up a majority.

And, of course, how you see yourself is not how others see you. You might consider yourself to be happy, but someone else might see you as unhappy, or vice versa. How important is how others see you, versus how you see yourself?

In addition, it’s not obvious that happiness should be the goal. There are many traits you might strive to have: to be kind, generous, thoughtful, helpful, and so on. Happiness may very well be an unintended (or intended) consequence of some of these.

Goal or not, you probably have a sense of your own happiness. Do you consider yourself a happy person? If you think about your day-to-day (or even hour-to-hour) life, is the answer still the same? And if you are an unhappy person, how might you bring a little more happiness into your life?

Related questions: Is happiness the most important purpose in life? Why don’t you know what makes you happy? What makes you the happiest? Why do we put up with unhappiness?

Rule Follower Or Rule Breaker?

Are you the type of person who follows all the rules? Or are you a rule breaker? Do you wish you were different?

Share why if you wish.

Rule Follower Or Rule Breaker?

What Makes For A Satisfied Mind?

To live well, some philosophies say, you should try to cultivate a satisfied mind. What does that mean, and how might you accomplish it?

There are many reasons why you mind might not be satisfied.

On a personal level, you might want more: more money, more status, more stuff. Ambition can be a good motivator, but it doesn’t produce satisfaction.

You might also look at the world and want more justice. You might see the flaws in our society, or empathize with plight of others that are suffering. That might lead you to attempt to seek positive change. That’s a good thing — but “satisfied” is not the word you would use to describe that.

There are also a host of issues to be worried about, from civil unrest, to artificial intelligence, to climate change, to income inequality, and on and on. Yet another reason why you might not have a satisfied mind.

So what can you do? How might you quell your fears, curb your wants and desires? To calm your thoughts, and bring about a state of being that is less anxiety ridden, and therefore more healthy? And lastly, is there a concern that cultivating a satisfied mind might dissociate you from others?

Related questions: What do you think about when your mind is not preoccupied? How do you find peace when you need it? What do you do to clear your mind? Are we too busy?