Do You Go To Reunions?

Whether it is for school, family, or work, people like to get together to see how friends and loved ones are doing. As well as to relive past glories and experiences. Have you been to a reunion of some sort? Do you intend to go to one in the future?

Share why if you wish.

Is Future You Or Past You A Different Person?

You know more than your past self knew. Your future self will have more experiences than your current self. Is that enough to make them different people?

Occasionally, it can be helpful to consider your future self a different person from your present self.

“That’s not my problem,” you might think to yourself. “That’s my future self’s problem.”

Similarly, if there is one person you can be sure that you are smarter than, it is you from the past. You have all the knowledge and experience that that person had, plus whatever you have learned or experienced since then.

But is that enough to define a different person?

Obviously, your past self, present self, and future self have some commonalities. The decisions that your past self made led to the current you, and what you do now will set the stage for who you will become.

In addition, you all share the same DNA, have the same parents, went to the same high school, and so on. You share a temporal existence.

However, your body, and everything around you, is constantly in flux. Each breath you take is slightly different in composition, the food you eat from meal to meal varies, your microbiome is always changing, and so on.

As the saying goes, you can never step in  the same river twice — all the water changes from moment to moment, as it rushes downstream and is replaced with the water coming after.

Is it the same with your body? As cells live, divide, and die, to be replaced by new cells, are you the same when most, or all, of your cells are replaced?

When you think about the person you used to be, or the person you will become, do you consider that a different person? Or are they all just you, with some minor tweaks and changes?

Related questions: What advice would you give your past self? Past, present, or future? How much does your past determine your future? What do we owe the future? How do you plan for the future?

How Do You Remember Someone Who Has Died?

Death, and dealing with it, is a part of life. When someone you know and like dies, how do you remember them?

The death of a friend or loved one can be traumatic, particularly if that death is unexpected. During the grieving process, there are two primary ways to remember someone.

The first is to remember, or memorialize, soon after the death. Stories might be shared, tears might be shed, and grieving is done communally. In your experience, what are ways that you have publicly celebrated someone’s life?

The second method takes place months and even years after the passing. Remembering what someone was like, after years have gone by, can be difficult. There may be pictures or video to help jog your memory, but even those can be incomplete. And for some people in your life, you may not have any photos or other media saved.

In any case, what can you do to keep that person in your mind? How can you continue to be inspired by them, or be amused, or even just maintain a presence in your life? Is it important?

Related questions: Why are people afraid of death? Does your memory define you? What makes a friendship? Does it matter how long we are remembered?

Does It Matter How Long We Are Remembered?

It is comforting to think that after we die, we will be remembered by others still living. But if we aren’t, what does that mean?

While human life spans have increased — in fact, more than doubled — in the last century or two, life is still exceedingly short. No one has managed to live past a hundred and fifty years old.

The way to immortality, then, is through our legacy. The children we raise. The work that we did that survives us. The stories and memories that continue to live on.

This is a common message through media. Emotional movies tug at our heartstrings, with characters saying that they feel the presence of a loved one. It is a common theme, understandably, at memorial services.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What gives a person value?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes you you?’


There are humans who have such an impact that they survive in our collective memory. It is usually through a discovery or artistic creation or a momentous feat of some kind. We know the name and achievements of someone who lived a thousand years ago. It would be nice if we were to have such an impact that we would be remembered or celebrated for hundreds or even thousands of years.

But would it really? It really makes no difference to you, after you die. Your death is not made better or happier if your name goes down in history.

Isn’t it more important to live your life in a fulfilling way right now? The future is uncertain at best, and won’t, barring unforeseen increases in human lifespans, include you?

Alternately, if you are not remembered, or only remembered for a short span of time, did your life, your existence, really mean anything at all?

Does it matter how long we are remembered?

Related questions: What gives a person value? Why are people afraid of death? What would you say to people in the future? How do you want to be remembered? Should we be concerned with legacy?

What Should You Let Go Of?

In order to grow, sometimes it is necessary to let go of a memory that is holding you back. Can you think of any such event in your life?

The New Year offers a convenient opportunity for introspection. During that period of self-examination, it is possible that you will realize that there are memories of events or people that are preventing you from realizing your potential.

There are many such traumatic or painful instances that you might obsess over. For example, your relationship with someone may be a cause of anxiety. Or you might regret a thoughtless action that you took without thinking.

The ability to let go, or move on with your life under such circumstances, can be very important. Obsessing over the past isn’t likely to be helpful or productive.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


But what does it mean to “let go”? In one instance, it might mean to forget about something entirely. Rather than replay a conversation over and over in your head, it might be better to relegate it to the past.

In another, it might be acceptance. If you come to terms with something that brings you emotional pain, it may be possible to accept it and move on.

It might also mean, literally, letting go. Throwing away a thing that has outlived its usefulness can be very meaningful.

At any rate, it is normal for human beings to be faced with regret over past speech and actions. Can you think of regrets of your own, ones that you would be best served to let go of?

Related questions: What mistake taught you the most? Are there beliefs about yourself you’ve had to let go? How do you learn? What can you control?