How Much Is Enough?

Does envy have you trying to “keep up with the Joneses?” Do you have a closet or segment of your home dedicated to barely-used items that now just take up space? Many Americans do a pretty good job at thinking of wants as needs. For instance, many sources note that while the United States holds less than 5% of the world’s population, we consume around a quarter of energy and other resources.

You’d think that with all the extra stuff and the money we use to buy it we must be happier, right? Not according to the World Economic Forum. According to a measure known as the Happiness Index (six significant factors which contribute to happiness), “although the US ranks highly for per capita income, it is only ranked 18th out of 156 countries, substantially below most comparably wealthy nations.”

Of course, per capita income stats are deceiving. Disparity runs deep in America. Millions of people live in deep poverty, not only lacking in material needs, but also the basics of adequate shelter and healthy food. While necessary, charitable responses can only go so far. Some would argue that structural changes are needed to reduce the suffering of the have-nots (e.g. changes to economic assistance, housing, and tax policy).  In other words, more must be asked of the rest of us.

So, how much is enough? This is not simply an economic question. It’s environmental as well.

Humanity is currently consuming resources at a pace faster than the Earth’s ecological systems can renew them. Collectively, we have significantly passed the planet’s regeneration line.

That brings up a couple of important questions for America and Americans: Should there be limits to how much a person, a community, or our country can have or consume? And, if so, should it be up to the individual, our government, or some independent standard to measure if we’ve reached the point of adequate consumption and/or possession?

How much is enough?

Related questions:  How Can We Appreciate Life More?What Material Possession Means The Most To You?What Makes You The Happiest?What Are Our Responsibilities To Others?

How Do You Choose A Hobby?

The hobbies we have say a lot about us. A job you might do for the money, to support yourself and your family. But the hobby you choose to do with your free time, what you might even spend money and effort to do, says something about who you are as a person.

Time is ultimately a limited resource for every one of us. You might make a lot of money, you can surround yourself with people who love you, you can educate yourself with class after class. You can control most of your other resources, but the resource of time is fundamentally limited.

So how we choose to spend our time is crucially important. What you do when you have the opportunity to do whatever you like might just be the closest you get to your true self.

Of course, the actual hobbies can vary quite drastically from person to person. Some people might have just one or two hobbies, some might have a hundred. They can be active or passive, they might involve others or just yourself. You might need intellectual stimulation after a day of drudgery, or maybe your brain needs some relaxing time after working hard all day. Maybe some of the hobbies you have are healthy, and maybe some of them are destructive.

Given how important hobbies are in our lives, we probably spend less time thinking about them than we should.

So have you given any thought to your personal list of hobbies? Have you thought about why you do what you do or why you like what you like? Are the various hobbies you have related in any way? What needs that you have are being met by your hobbies? Conversely, what needs are not being met that could be with the right hobby?

How do you choose a hobby?

Related questions: What are your favorite hobbies? Why do we like what we like? What makes you you? What makes you the happiest?

How Are You Special?

On the PBS show Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood, host Fred Rogers regularly looked into the camera and spoke directly to the viewer. “You are special,” he would affirm.

This was a powerful message to the audience of children, who were most likely not used to hearing such a thing from an adult, particularly one on television.

The underlying idea, that each individual is special and important, is also useful for adults. Too often, it is easy to be a cog in a machine at work, or overwhelmed as a spouse or as a parent at home. Sometimes, we need a simple reminder of our own specialness.

Give it some thought. What can you do better than anything else? What sets you apart from those around you? In what ways are you important? How are you special?

Related questions: Why do we care what strangers think of us? Why do we feel the need to belong? What makes you you? How can we build confidence? Why is love important?