What Are You Doing To Make The World A Better Place?

It’s not a stretch to say that each one of wants to live in a better world. We want to see an improvement to our current circumstance.

Perhaps that means better for you personally, with a better job or a better house. Maybe you want better for your family and loved ones. Or maybe you hope for a better world for humanity in general, with longer life spans and better overall health.

However, things don’t get better unless someone drives that improvement. You can hope that you are the beneficiary of the work of someone else, but to see change, positive change, in your life you have to work at it.

Maybe that means that you need to ask your boss for a raise. Or perhaps you attend a march for a cause you believe in. You might attend a city council meeting, or donate money to a charity.

There are lots of ways to affect change, but first you need to know what improvement you want to see. Then you must take some action if you really want things to get better. Be the change you want to see in the world.

So what do you do? What actions do you take, what conversations are you a part of, what organizations do you join? What do you do to make the world a better place?

Related questions: How can we turn ideas into actions? What are our responsibilities to others? How do you define success? What are you optimistic about? Is it a cruel world?

What Gives You Purpose?

The idea of why you do the things you do, what motivates you to take the actions that you take on a daily, weekly, or yearly basis has a name: purpose.

A purpose can be a very personal thing, and it may be unique to each individual. Some may be motivated by money. Others may want to take care of their family or loved ones. Some strive to save lives, or ease the suffering of others. Or living a life of luxury, or seeking approval of your parents, or fulfilling a need to create, or…

Knowing  your purposes in life and working to achieve them can be a powerful motivating influence. Conversely, not knowing what your purpose is, or being unable to work toward it can lead to a life full of frustration.

What gives you purpose? What are you doing to fulfill that purpose?

Related questions: Is happiness the most important purpose in life? How do you define success? What makes you you? What makes you the happiest?

How Much Is Enough?

Does envy have you trying to “keep up with the Joneses?” Do you have a closet or segment of your home dedicated to barely-used items that now just take up space? Many Americans do a pretty good job at thinking of wants as needs. For instance, many sources note that while the United States holds less than 5% of the world’s population, we consume around a quarter of energy and other resources.

You’d think that with all the extra stuff and the money we use to buy it we must be happier, right? Not according to the World Economic Forum. According to a measure known as the Happiness Index (six significant factors which contribute to happiness), “although the US ranks highly for per capita income, it is only ranked 18th out of 156 countries, substantially below most comparably wealthy nations.”

Of course, per capita income stats are deceiving. Disparity runs deep in America. Millions of people live in deep poverty, not only lacking in material needs, but also the basics of adequate shelter and healthy food. While necessary, charitable responses can only go so far. Some would argue that structural changes are needed to reduce the suffering of the have-nots (e.g. changes to economic assistance, housing, and tax policy).  In other words, more must be asked of the rest of us.

So, how much is enough? This is not simply an economic question. It’s environmental as well.

Humanity is currently consuming resources at a pace faster than the Earth’s ecological systems can renew them. Collectively, we have significantly passed the planet’s regeneration line.

That brings up a couple of important questions for America and Americans: Should there be limits to how much a person, a community, or our country can have or consume? And, if so, should it be up to the individual, our government, or some independent standard to measure if we’ve reached the point of adequate consumption and/or possession?

How much is enough?

Related questions:  How Can We Appreciate Life More?What Material Possession Means The Most To You?What Makes You The Happiest?What Are Our Responsibilities To Others?