Bigger Fish Or Bigger Pond?

We give you the classic question: would you rather be a big fish in a little pond, or a little fish in a big pond?

Share why if you wish.

Bigger Fish Or Bigger Pond?

How Important Is Closure?

When coming to grips with a sudden change in life, some people feel the need for closure in order to move on. But is it really necessary?

Life can change very quickly, in ways both trivial and profound. You might lose a job, there might be a death in the family, or an appliance you depend on may stop functioning.

When a change like this happens, a natural instinct is to look for some closure. That might mean, respectively, an exit interview, a memorial service, or a repairperson’s visit. Once the closure happens, you can move on with your life.

However, closure is not something that occurs in our lives. We are born into a world that is already in motion, and as we grow and learn, we have to get up to speed on the state of things (and pick up some history as well).

Even when we meet someone new, we come in the middle of their story. And if they drift away, as friends sometimes do, there isn’t usually any sort of meaningful end point.

There is little doubt, though, that as a species we crave the sense of narrative completion. We look for it in the movies we watch, the books we read, and in other media we consume. A disappointing finale can ruin an entire TV series.

So which is it? Is a sense of closure necessary to process the events of the day? Or is it irrelevant, just an artificial narrative we construct that has no inherent meaning?

How important is closure?

Related questions: Why are people afraid of death? What can you control? Scripted or unscripted? How do you find peace when you need it?

What Are You Going To Neglect?

There is more to do in this world than there is time to do it. As a consequence, you will have to neglect some things. But what?

There are many strategies for setting priorities. For instance, there is a plane with urgency on one set of axis, and importance on the other. You sort tasks appropriately, and go from there.

However, one way of looking at the events in your life is from a negative point of view. That is, instead of thinking of what things you want to include and what you want to do, instead think about what you are willing to neglect in favor of other things.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘Are we too busy?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What are our responsibilities to others?’


After all, there is not enough time in the day to do everything. No matter how efficient you are, no matter how little sleep you need, you won’t get to everything. You can, however, choose which things get skipped.

An advantage to viewing life this way is that unimportant yet enjoyable things don’t get skipped. There may be activities or tasks that might not make your top ten list of things to do, but your life would be poorer without them. Conversely, something might seem more pressing and yet you can make do without it.

Are there things in your life that you simply don’t want to do without, even if they might not seem to someone else to be “must do” activities? Are there things that you know you can neglect?

Related questions: How do you set priorities? What is important? Are we too busy? What is one thing you feel the need to do each day?

Where Do You Find Meaning In Your Life?

In the various aspects of your life, which ones provide meaning? In other words, what makes your life worth living?

We’ve talked before about values, and purpose. What do you do, and why do you do it? What drives you, motivates you to get out of bed, go to work, and in general behave like an adult?


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What gives a person value?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes you you?’


But there is something that we haven’t talked about much: meaning. What are the areas of your life that mean the most to you? What would you miss the most if it were to vanish?

Where do you find meaning in your life?

Related questions: What gives you purpose? What is your life about? Why are we here? What are your values? What is important?

What Do You Do That Matters?

It is up to each person to decide what is important and what is not. Not everything you do has to be something that matters. However, to lead a meaningful life, you must do some important things.

There are, of course, many different ways of measuring what matters.

One way is to contribute to your community. You might do this through the job that you have, through your relationship with your neighbors, or some volunteer effort. It might be important to you to be an upstanding citizen.

Another way is to recognize and develop your own skills and strengths. That might mean taking classes, being introspective, or seeing a therapist. Being a good person might be what matters to you. Are you hard-working, innovative, or punctual? Or one of many, many other traits?


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss the related question: ‘What gives a person value?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes you you?’


Similarly, how you interact with loved ones may matter the most to you. It might be important to be a good parent to your child or children. Perhaps you are the fun cousin, or the consummate host.

In addition, there are several other ways you can do something that matters to you. And, of course, multiple things can matter to you at the same time.

What matters to you, and what do you do to show it? What do you think is the relationship between what you think is important, and the actions that you take? How might you increase the number of meaningful things you do?

Related questions: What is important? What are you doing to make the world a better place? How do you determine what matters? Everything matters or nothing matters?