Are There Beliefs About Yourself You’ve Had To Let Go?

It is a simple fact that people change and grow over time. Have you ever been aware of your personal change, and jettisoned beliefs about yourself?

These changes can be something simple and straightforward. For example, later in life you might grow to like a food that you couldn’t stand before. Your belief about yourself (i.e. “I don’t like tomatoes”) might need to be amended, or even dropped.

But sometimes, the belief in question might be quite abstract, or even key to your concept of self. As you age, cornerstone beliefs, like political party, religious affiliation, or career aspirations might need to be tweaked. Some might even require a complete overhaul.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What beliefs do you have that might be wrong?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What makes a place feel like home?’


An extreme example of this would be a belief that you felt was central to who you are, one that you swore repeatedly would never change. And yet, over time, as your experiences increase, you attitude might shift subtly at first, and eventually become completely different. Has this ever happened to you?

Introspection can be a valuable tool in your mental health tool kit. Knowing what you believe in, and periodically reviewing those beliefs, can lead to your being honest with yourself. It might also lead to a mo0re fulfilled life.

Do you have any beliefs about yourself that have changed over time?

Related questions: How have you changed? What makes you you? How can we encourage meaningful conversation? What is necessary to change your mind?

 

 

How Are You A Non-Conformist?

There are many ways that you can be different from the crowd, some obvious and so not so obvious. How are you a non-conformist?

Social pressure encourages people to fit in. To become one of the crowd. In our current capitalist society, to become just a cog in a larger societal machine.

While there is some value in that, as individuals we often struggle to be the unique beings we naturally are. There is no one in the world that is quite like me, from my DNA to my fingerprints to my upbringing to my personality.

And so we find ways to display that uniqueness. We are all, in one way or another, non-conformists.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘What makes you you?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘What gives a person value?’


Some people shake off the yoke of conformity as rebellious teenagers. That might take the form of defying our parents, or dressing or behaving in ways that are not expected of us.

For others, being a non-conformist comes later in life. You might get a tattoo that has some sort of significance to you. Perhaps you decorate your work space in ways that are different from your co-workers. Clothing or jewelry can be used to set you apart from your peers.

Those choices are fine if you want to convey to everyone else that you have a streak of individuality. However, some might choose to be less obvious. They might seem just like everyone else from the outside, but they have a vibrant inner life, through what they read, or write. Or just think about.

Do you know the way in which you stand out from a crowd? Have you consciously chosen it, or does your lack of conformity come naturally? How are you a non-conformist?

Related questions: Individual or society? How much power does an individual have? How are you special?

Classic Or Contemporary?

Do you have more of “classic” outlook, or are you more of a contemporary type of person? You can choose whatever metric you prefer: music, architecture, fashion, etc.

Share why if you wish.

Classic Or Contemporary?

How Do You Demonstrate Your Values?

We all have values that we live our lives by. How do you live those values? What do you to do demonstrate them?

An individual, a company, or a country has values that are important to them. These can may be openly stated, or simply internal. Nonetheless, they exist and are on display.

The first, and most common, value is self-preservation. You want to continue to go on living, preferably improving your lot in life as you go along. In extreme situations, some of us may choose to give up our lives for something we value even more, but that is unusual, to say the least.


Listen to a podcast where Michael and Lee discuss a related question: ‘How do you define success?’ We also discuss a bonus question: ‘Is happiness the most important purpose in life?’


Beyond self-preservation, the values we could possibly have can be many. And the sum total of all possible ones among the population of the earth is truly staggering.

Some may value family and friends, and connections with others. Others, perhaps money and luxury. Perhaps what motivates you is justice, for yourself and others.

Of course, you can have more than one competing for your attention. The reasoning about what to do in any given situation can involve a complicated, complex series of considerations, in order to satisfy your many values as closely as possible.

As an individual, do you know what your values are? What actions or behaviors do you perform on a daily, monthly, or annual basis to live by those values? How do you demonstrate them?

Related questions: What gives a person value? Is value intrinsic or relative? What are your values? How do you set priorities? What is important?