What Stories Are Most Important To You?

Throughout our lives, we are constantly surround by stories of one kind or another. Which ones matter most to you?

Stories come in many different kinds. Some are personal, some are entertainment, and some are societal.

For example of a personal story, we have the those we tell ourselves about ourselves. You might, for example, tell everyone, including yourself, that you are always on time. As a result, you become known as the punctual one of your group. Or you always have the latest gadget, or maybe the cleanest house.

Whatever you tell yourself (and carry through on) you can manifest and make real. You define yourself through the stories you tell about yourself.

We also have access to more entertainment options than ever before. From movies to TV shows, from video games to novels, from sports to social media, we have a never-ending stream of tales told by all kinds of people. They might shock you, make you laugh, tug at your heartstrings, or open your eyes to other points of view.

Finally, we come to societal stories. These are things we tell each other that help us function in tandem. We cooperate because we hear a story and believe it.

For example, why do you pay your taxes? Perhaps you believe the story that our pooled resources makes our community stronger and benefits everyone. Or maybe you just believe the story that you will face a penalty if you don’t.

There are many stories, in all aspects of your life. Which ones mean the most to you? Are there some you never question? Might there be a benefit, or a penalty, to doing so?

Related questions: What are the benefits of fiction? Where do shared ideas exist? What makes a community? What makes you you?

How Do You Describe What You Do?

Whether it is your career, your hobbies, or your private life, how you describe yourself can alter how the world sees you. What is your description?

Describing what you do, while important, can be very difficult. While it is true that what you choose to spend your time and focus on helps define you as a human being, an accurate description isn’t easy.

In fact, the manner and vocabulary you use to talk about what you do has many risks. You might bore someone else if you choose to talk about it in a clinical way. It is possible you could alienate someone who doesn’t share a common frame of reference. You might even offend someone.

And yet, sharing who you are and what you do with others is the essence of being in a community. If you have an interest in and a passion for what you do, you can convey that to someone else. And in turn, they may convey the same thing to you, if you are lucky.

How do you describe what you do? Have you given advance thought to what you might say to someone else? And do you listen when others describe what they do?

Related questions: Would you be friends with yourself? How would you describe yourself in ten words or less? How do you judge yourself? What makes a community?

Do You Consider Yourself A Happy Person?

Everyone is happy some of the time, and unhappy other times. On the whole, though, do you consider yourself to be a happy person?

How can you tell? It is tempting to simply count the number of times you are happy. If you are happy more often than not, you are a happy person.

But that can miss an important nuance: you may consider yourself to be a happy person, even if you are unhappy more than fifty percent of the time. Similarly, you might consider yourself to be an unhappy person, even if the happy times make up a majority.

And, of course, how you see yourself is not how others see you. You might consider yourself to be happy, but someone else might see you as unhappy, or vice versa. How important is how others see you, versus how you see yourself?

In addition, it’s not obvious that happiness should be the goal. There are many traits you might strive to have: to be kind, generous, thoughtful, helpful, and so on. Happiness may very well be an unintended (or intended) consequence of some of these.

Goal or not, you probably have a sense of your own happiness. Do you consider yourself a happy person? If you think about your day-to-day (or even hour-to-hour) life, is the answer still the same? And if you are an unhappy person, how might you bring a little more happiness into your life?

Related questions: Is happiness the most important purpose in life? Why don’t you know what makes you happy? What makes you the happiest? Why do we put up with unhappiness?

Ask Questions Or Answer Questions?

When it comes to questions, are you more comfortable asking them or answering them? Is one more important than the other?

Share why if you wish.

Ask Questions Or Answer Questions?