What Unimportant Things Do You Focus On Too Much?

Do you find that you spend your time worrying about unimportant things, while ignoring big ones?

If so, you’re not alone. Focusing on trivial things is such a part of the human condition, there are even adages warning against it.

For example, take the phrase, “Penny wise, pound foolish.” Saving money on little things is meaningless if you waste money on big-ticket items.

Also, consider the saying, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” If we can only focus on the important things in life, it will save us time and even health in the end.

And yet, we often obsess over tiny details. Why would a person may behave this way?

For one, you may not know how to attack a big problem, but you can solve a small one. Thus, you turn your attention to what you know how to do. I can’t fix climate change, so I’m going to obsess on cleaning my house.

Alternately, you may not even realize there is a bigger issue. For example, you may be promoting one political opponent over another, without realizing that money in politics is a corrupting influence on both parties.

Sometimes, a smaller concern is simply more appealing. Ultimately, watching a TV show may not be important, but it’s more fun than doing your taxes.

Whatever the reason, every one of does this to some extent.

To combat this, we need to accurately determine the relative importance of things. In addition, we need to have the determination to tackle the big problems or issues as they come up.

Are there specific minor things that you find yourself obsessing over, at the expense of more significant issues? What unimportant things do you focus on too much?

Related questions: What is important? Is our attention fractured? What deserves your attention?

Simple Or Complex?

Do you believe things are simple, or are they complex? What about the universe as a whole? Do you prefer simplicity or complexity?

Share why if you wish.

Simple Or Complex?

Mind Or Body?

No doubt, you use both. But do you prefer your mind or your body? Is one of them more useful than the other in our modern world?

Share why if you wish.

Mind Or Body?

What Do You Do Best?

It is important to know where your weaknesses lie, so that you can improve upon them. However, it is just as important to understand what you do best, so you can capitalize on that strength.

Do you know what you are best at? You might be good at many things; you might be good at few. But of all the things you do, there is something that you do better than anything else. What is it?

Knowing what it is that you excel at can be very powerful. It allows you to tailor your life accordingly, so that you can maximize your impact on the world. Your job, your friends, your hobbies, your life partner — knowing your strengths might impact all these choices.

Of course, there may also be other factors to consider as well. What you enjoy the most is important, and isn’t necessarily the same (although it might be). Other things to consider might be areas of greatest need, or, earning potential.

At any rate, knowing where your skills lie can help you to live a more fulfilled life. What do you do best?

Related questions: Why do we like what we like? How do you define success? How do you judge yourself? What gives a person value?

 

 

How Do You Evaluate Risk?

Every day, we must evaluate risk. Our entire lives are a balancing act between what we want, and what we are willing to risk to get it.

As children, we start to learn this lesson. For example, you might want to express yourself by something you say or do or wear. But are you willing to risk being embarrassed in front of other students?

Later on as adults, the risk/reward calculation continues. Maybe you want a better job, that pays more or offers new challenges. So, are you willing to risk leaving your stable, current job?

Sometimes, risky actions are rewarded. You might risk rejection by approaching a romantic interest, but are rewarded with a date. But risk sometimes leads to negative consequences. Maybe your offer of a date gets rebuffed.

As a result, we get used to figuring out: is the reward worth the risk? Can I live with the odds of failure versus the odds of success?

Now, more than ever, we need to perform these internal calculations. Unfortunately, we don’t have much experience in determining the likelihood of contracting the disease. No one does, because this virus is new and unknown.

As some restrictions are loosened, we all must weigh the risks against the reward. For instance, let’s say I want to eat out. Is the seating indoor or outdoor? How close will I be sitting to other customers? Will my server be wearing a mask? Are the kitchens cleaned routinely?

And pretty much all public activity will have to be evaluated in this way. Do I have pre-existing conditions? Am I  likely to end up in the hospital  — or even die — if I get sick? Similarly, how likely are my loved ones to survive an infection? How badly do I want these groceries, or that paycheck, or to hear that band?

This is something that is going to play a more important part of our lives going forward. How do you evaluate risk?

Related questions: How important is intuition? What is necessary to change your mind? Why are people afraid of death? Freedom or security? What are you willing to sacrifice?